Blog

Peachtree City bankruptcy attorney writes about situations and issues that matter to those who need to file for bankruptcy, or those who just need some information about the process in order to make an informed choice.

Flawed Georgia Garnishment Law Being Fixed

Posted by in Uncategorized

Flawed Georgia garnishment law being fixed.

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Take Care of Your Loved Ones

Posted by in Estate Planning

Take Care of Your Loved Ones

Not just physically, but emotionally and financially–especially after you pass away.  Don’t leave your family without a roadmap of what you want to happen to your money, your things, and your body.  An estate planning session with me is complimentary so we can decide what’s best for those you will leave behind when you die.  Let’s face it–we all die.  Hopefully, we will all live a long, productive, happy life, but there are no guarantees.   If you die without a will in the State of Georgia, your property and money may not go exactly where you thought they would.  If you have children, your house may wind up belonging to your spouse and children jointly.  If the children are underaged, the court would have to assign a guardian for them if your spouse wanted to sell the house.  This is not true in all cases; it depends on how the property is titled.  Talk to me–we can figure that out.   If you don’t have a will, your spouse (if you have one) may not be able to access any money you had until several weeks after your death.  They would have to ask the court to be appointed administrator of your estate and that entails a notice in the newspaper that has to run for several weeks so others can object if they are so inclined.  Not fun, when your spouse may need those funds to keep a roof over his/her head and feed the kids!   No one wants to think about dying.  I get that.  But once you’ve set up your will and powers of attorney, you don’t have to worry about what will happen to your loved ones when you finally do.   Call me at 770-631-2334 to set up a meeting to talk about your wishes and needs in estate planning....

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What Do You Want to Ask a Bankruptcy Attorney?

Posted by in Bankruptcy

If you could meet me face to face for a consultation, what would you ask me? I’m looking for ideas for new blog posts and would love to answer questions (no specific legal advice, but I can point you in the right direction).

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I Can’t Pay My Credit Cards; How Do I Pay You?

Posted by in Bankruptcy

I Can’t Pay My Credit Cards; How Do I Pay You?

How do you pay your bankruptcy attorney when you can’t pay your debts? Here’s how.

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They’ve Repo’d My Car! What Can I Do?

Posted by in Bankruptcy, Uncategorized

They’ve Repo’d My Car!  What Can I Do?

Car been picked up by the creditor? How you might get it back.

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Do I Have to List Money I Owe to My Grandmother?

Posted by in Bankruptcy

Do I Have to List Money I Owe to My Grandmother?

When you are filing for bankruptcy, the rules are that you must list ALL debts to everyone. No exception. If you owe $1,000 (or any amount at all) to your mom, dad, aunt, uncle, grandparent, or your next-door neighbor, you are supposed to list it. Some clients ask: “How will the court know I owe this person?” Answer: They might not find out. But: They might. Sometimes a person to whom you owe money will find out about your bankruptcy and appear at your Meeting of Creditors. It can get very sticky when they ask why they weren’t listed in your bankruptcy, thinking they may be paid at least a portion of what you owe them. Failure to list ALL debts is a crime in bankruptcy and can cause your case to be dismissed. It can also cause the bankruptcy court to declare that debt (and others) as non-dischargeable, meaning you are stuck with them even if your other debts are discharged. Always list everyone to whom you owe money. Be honest in your bankruptcy paperwork and the process will run much more smoothly. Your attorney can help you if she knows the complete picture. Call me at 770-631-2334 to set up a free consultation to discuss what’s right for your...

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Do I Need a Gun Trust?

Posted by in Estate Planning

Do I Need a Gun Trust?

If you own a gun, you need a gun trust. The National Firearms Act has made a Gun Trust an important part of your estate planning. You want your loved ones to be able to keep the gun(s) you have without the government coming to take them if they aren’t correctly registered and taken care of in your estate. Call me at 770-631-2334 to set an appointment to have your gun trust prepared. Estate planning is important–don’t wait till it’s too late.

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Help! I’m Being Garnished!

Posted by in Bankruptcy

Help!  I’m Being Garnished!

Paycheck being garnished? I may be able to get it back for you!

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What’s an Employer Deduction Order?

Posted by in Bankruptcy, Blog

What’s an Employer Deduction Order?

If you file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you will be making a monthly payment to the trustee of your case.  He will pay your creditors in the bankruptcy from that payment.   The easiest way to take care of this payment is to have it automatically come out of your paycheck and be sent to the trustee.  An Employer Deduction Order does this.  Your attorney will file it with the court, who then notifies your employer of the amount of the payment and how often it is to be sent to the trustee.  It’s automatic and you don’t have to think about it.   When your bankruptcy is complete (usually three to five years later), the trustee notifies your employer to stop deducting the funds.   I always recommend this to my clients.  Some clients don’t want their employer to know they’ve filed, so they choose to pay their payment each month themselves.   If you have any questions, please call me at...

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Will My Boss Find Out if I File for Bankruptcy?

Posted by in Bankruptcy, Blog

Will My Boss Find Out if I File for Bankruptcy?

When I file for bankruptcy, does my employer find out? Sometimes. Read here to find out more.

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